APIC Survey 2020

Angie Szumlinski
|
January 4, 2021
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The Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) conducted an online survey of its 11,922 U.S.-based infection preventionist members on October 22-November 5, 2020. Results from the survey are based on responses from 1,083 infection preventionists located throughout the United States.

Here are a few interesting findings regarding PPE and medical supplies:

  • PPE Crisis Standards of Care

For which of the following has your hospital or agency implemented PPE crisis standards of care (i.e., decontamination, extended use, or re-use) at any time during the COVID-19 pandemic?

  • 75.8% eye protection
    • 73% respirators; 38.65% – re-use as many times as possible
    • 68.7% masks; 56.8% – re-use as many times as possible
    • 43.8% isolation gowns
    • 10.1% Gloves
  • I am concerned about the impact of medical supply shortages on my facilities related to the current 2020-2021 influenza season
    • 46% somewhat agree
    • 33% strongly agree
    • 9% neither agree nor disagree
  • I am more concerned about the impact of medical supply shortages on my facility related to the current 2020-2021 influenza season compared to previous years because of the pandemic
    • 51% strongly agree
    • 33% somewhat agree
    • 8% neither agree nor disagree
  • I am concerned about my facility’s healthcare surge capacity related to the current 2020-2021 influenza season and pandemic
    • 37% somewhat agree
    • 35% strongly agree
    • 16% neither agree nor disagree

These responses should give you a reason to pause. Think about where we were in March, shortages of PPE and medical supplies. We definitely don’t want to repeat that scenario! Please take the time to evaluate where you are with supplies intended to protect your staff and residents. Use the PPE burn calculator on the CDC website, talk to staff but more importantly, observe what is happening on the units! Stay the course, stay strong, stay well, mask up, and stay tuned!


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